This is Not News

I’ve been doing a lot of work in WordPress lately. Unfortunately (or fortunately!) for you, fair reader, all of said work has been on the back end. Now that I’ve wrestled back control of the Oliver Crumb blog, I’ve been able to upgrade it and give it some love (again, all on the back end- it looks pretty much the same on the surface). I also have control of the email accounts at the Oliver Crumb domain again. We’re now using Google Apps for Gmail, Google Calendar, GoogleDocs, etc., on all of Russell’s theatre domains. I’m very happy with it. Thus far we haven’t used Google Apps to it’s full potential but as the company grows, I imagine  collaborative workspace will be more and more important.

On the life front, this week got WAY more interesting than originally slated. I’m doing my usual movie night thing tonight. Tomorrow night we are celebrating Father’s Day with Ann and David at Upland. I’m looking forward to seeing the parentals!  Thursday night Russell decided that we needed to see the Fantasticks at his alma mater so we’ll be leaving right when he gets home from work to see the show in Terre Haute.  Then I have to be at work at 6 in the morning because I will be leaving at noon to head to Normal, Illinois, where Tim and I will hit our first drum corps show of the season. I’ll be seeing my Cavies and the Crown (and many other most excellent corps) at DCI Central Illinois. Pysched! We’ll get back in town sometime Saturday afternoon and then I will FINALLY see Duck Soup Saturday night with the Russell-Mama. If you’ve friended me on Facebook, you may have seen the Duck Soup photos by Chris Eller. Exciting! I’ll be winding up the weekend with a Sunday afternoon shift at Avers. Had I known my week would be this full, I would have requested off the whole damn weekend. Oh well. I hope to have pictures (where permitted, of course) from some of these happenings. I’ve been shamefully bad about using my camera lately.

My blogs have been an epic ‘crickets chirping, tumbleweeds blowing’ kind of quiet lately but I’ve been posting away to Twitter and Google Reader.

Currently reading: Nothing. Oh, sorry, I’ve been reading Jane Austen: Her Life and Letters via DailyLit on my iPod, usually while I’m on the bus. Other than that, nope, nothing.
Currently listening: “Anodyne,” Down and Above

More RSS

An addendum to my previous post on RSS… I just saw this post “Google Reader for Beginners.” These folks posted a few videos on YouTube to get your Reader started quickly.

I recently started sharing items that I found interesting. I can make a note on a piece of news and those who’ve been granted access can see these items with my comments (if they are also using GoogleReader). Commenting on and sharing news items is much faster than blogging or even Tweeting…

RSS: a PSA

Do yo- [coughhack]

[musters announcer voice]

Do you spend hoards of time trolling from website to website to find new content?

Friend, it is time to make the interweb your bitch.

Learn about RSS readers here.

This 4 minute video explains why RSS feeds will save you time and how to set up a feed reader quickly and easily.

Just about every site worth visiting is using RSS these days. WhiteHouse.gov: yep. Cake Wrecks: uh huh. Garfield Minus Garfield: you betcha.

Deciding which feed reader to use? Try Bloglines or Google Reader. Google Reader is highly recommended.

What are you still doing here? Go learn how the cool kids experience the web.

For extra fly-points, subscribe to Puddles with this address: http://cursedstorm.com/puddles/feed/

Stupid English-Centric Girl

Just in time for a slew of Catalan language cataloging I have to do, Catalan now appears in Google Translate’s list of languages. Huzzah! Catalan is easily the language that gives me the most trouble, so I wouldn’t know whether or not Google is doing a good job of translating. Fortunately, for my job, I usually can get by with the gist. In any case, Google’s ‘Suggest a better translation’ link allows the Translator to ‘learn,’ so with user input, this tool should improve.

It looks like a few other languages were added as well. I don’t remember Vietnamese or Filipino being available before (but then again, I don’t catalog materials in these langauges, so they wouldn’t be on my radar).

Play nice and share

A life philosophy? Sure, sure. Contrawise, I want to see if anyone else is using Google Documents. If not, is anyone interested in trying it out? I’d like to play around with Google Doc’s shared document feature. If you’re interested, email me.

Ebook training today. W00t! It’s quite similar to electronic resource cataloging, with some added fussiness about edition and format. Incidentally, I’ve been meaning to create a catalog record for my blog. It’d be a great way to brush up on my RDF.

Book Descriptions

Feeling too lazy to swing a rough translation of a book I was cataloging, I looked the book up in amazon.fr and had Google translate the description. The results are below but what does it mean?

The left is capilotade and rebuilding is valid. Some want the press center, others on the left antilibérale. But it apparently does not wish to become adult as it refuses a real Thursday dialectic between his ethics conviction and his ethics of responsibility. It should therefore be left as a lover of freedom that the liberal left and as drastic as the far left. This is not a pipe dream, because she really existed: it is the libertarian left…

Huh. I think the publisher tried to get cute when writing the back cover blurb, using jargon and colloquial phrases, which resulted in this truly bizarre translation.

Dear Publishers,

In the future, please have the courtesy to include title descriptions that are clear, concise and written with unambiguous language. Oh, and for heaven’s sake, obtain a unique ISBN with each new edition of a work!

Love, hugs, etc.,
Jenny

Brownies to the first person who comes up with two suitable LC subject headings for the description above.

NetLibrary

OK, the last topic for IUL2.0! Anyone feeling sentimental? Hand raise? Head shake?

I pulled up CSS mastery: advanced web standards solutions by Andy Budd on NetLibrary (I wasn’t able to download it). I can see the usefulness of having reference books such as this one in electronic format. I can save a copy and consult it when needed with the capability of searching full-text. I wouldn’t want to screen-read for leisure titles. Who works at a computer for 8 hours a day, 5 days a week? Hand raise.

On the other hand, as a student, I loved seeing a hyperlink in the catalog to full-text, allowing me to see immediately whether or not the item was relevant to my needs. Similarly, I have browsed out-of-print books on Google Books Search, which unlike NetLibrary, reproduces and displays title pages. No title pages? NetLibrary, are you serious? Head shake.

When perusing NetLibrary, I often found myself wondering whether a book I was looking at was born digital or was merely a digital copy. Do ebooks have unique ISBNs? What would a FRBRized record look like?

Who’s gearing up for cataloging ebooks?

Jen raises hand.

Reader shakes head.

Google Docs

Is it Not Nifty? A Google Document


Table of Contents

Introduction

Features

Fun in Other Tabs

Introduction

In this IUL 2.0 exercise, I am investigating web-based applications. I was intriugued by the Zoho products, but I opted to try out the Google services instead, as I already have a Google account (and I don’t exactly relish the thought of having yet another account somewhere else). This looks simple enough. Let’s try some features.

Features

The block quotes seem to work nicely (although I won’t know for sure until I post). Below is a quote from my previous post.

I got preoccupied by wondering about the people who lived or worked in these structures. What were their lives like? Who were they? And then, I started to wonder, am I really feeling them here? Well, it is Jersey, so it is entirely possible that I was just overloaded in the presence of all of that clean air and oxygen, rather than having some sort of empathic encounter.

I also like that there are a lot of features that would make this document html ready, such as headers and hyperlinks. I just tried the headers and it didn’t work exactly as expected. I suspect I could tweak the html and fix this- if I cared to spend that much time on this.

Fun in Other Tabs

From the Insert tab, I can add bookmarks within the document, which I imagine to work something like anchors in an html document.

Conclusion

It seems as though Google Documents can do pretty much all of the essential tasks as MS Word. I can comment a document, view versions and share this document with others- all while being independent of flash drives, etc. I like the capability to save in html, pdf or send this to a blog, which I will soon attempt.

This is the part where, once I’ve posted from within Google Docs, I edit the post from within Blogger, to see what that looks like. Oh, I just saw that there are RSS feeds available for your Google document, making collaborative editing easier. It is official. I have a tech crush on Google.